Posts Tagged ‘Confluence’

Making PDFs in Confluence

Posted in Confluence and JIRA on December 12th, 2011 by Jenny – 3 Comments

New Zealand PohutukawaIn the mailbag this week, a reader asked if there’s a way to convert a Confluence wiki into a PDF. When we get our Confluence wiki off the ground, this will be an absolute necessity for our team too since we have some customers who are not online 24/7.

I’ve found two ways to make a PDF:

1. Make a PDF of a single Confluence page

  1. In Confluence, find the page that you want to turn into a PDF.
  2. Click Tools, then select Export to PDF.
  3. Save the PDF somewhere you’ll be able to find it.

2. Make a PDF of a Confluence space or selected pages

  1. In Confluence, find the space you want to save as a PDF.
  2. Click Browse, then select Advanced.
  3. Click PDF Export.
  4. Click Select All to save the whole site as a PDF, or select the pages you want to save as a PDF. Note: There is also a link on this page for the PDF Stylesheet if you want to change the appearance of the PDF.
  5. Click Export.
  6. When the export is complete, click the link for Download here.
  7. Save the PDF somewhere you’ll be able to find it.

That’s it. Pretty straightforward!

Resources:
Exporting Confluence Pages and Spaces to PDF
Customising the Appearance of PDF Exports

 

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Photo via Flickr user Abaconda

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Copying a Space from one Confluence wiki instance to another

Posted in Confluence and JIRA, Tools on May 4th, 2011 by Jenny – 2 Comments

Cottage in KingstonAt the moment I have a Confluence wiki installed on my desktop. Next we want to install Confluence on a server to test the integration of the wiki with our Umbraco website and LDAP security.

So that we can demo Confluence to others in the group quickly, I need to copy a Space from my local instance of Confluence into the new instance on the server. I’ve searched the Confluence documentation, and it looks like I need to export the space as a zipped XML archive, and then import the xml archive into the new instance. Let’s see how this works.

Before you begin, make sure you have Export Space permissions. Since I’m the administrator of this test Confluence instance, I have full access.

1. Export a space from one Confluence instance

  1. In Confluence, navigate to the space you want to export.
  2. Click Browse, then select Advanced.
  3. Click XML Export.
  4. Select All pages to export.
  5. If you want to include comments or attachments, select the appropriate check boxes.
  6. Click Export.
    A progress bar shows you the progress of the export.
  7. When the export is complete, click the link for Download here.
    (It’s a very small link, so be careful you don’t miss it. I’d suggest to the Confluence team that it should be much more prominent, perhaps even a button.)
  8. Save the zip file somewhere you’ll be able to find it.

2. Import the space into the new Confluence instance

  1. In Confluence, from the Dashboard, click Browse, then select Confluence Admin.
  2. In the Administration section, click Backup & Restore.
  3. Choose a method for importing the space: upload a zipped backup, or restore a backup from a file system.
    Since I want to import a space from another instance, I’ll select the first method.
  4. Click Browse, locate the exported zip file, then click Open.
  5. Click Upload and restore.
    A progress bar shows you the progress of the import.

Since my space was just a few pages, there were no problems, and the whole process took just a few minutes. With a large space I imagine this might take a lot longer.

The Confluence documentation has lots of warnings about not copying a space over another space (if you try to import a space that already exists in a Confluence instance). This made me a bit nervous, but when I tried to do this very thing, Confluence warned me that a space existed with the same key, thus saving me from overwriting my files. I think if I was going to do this in a development environment, I’d want to test it several times in a test environment first, to be sure I didn’t overwrite anything unintentionally.

The main thing to watch for seems to be the space key. When you export a space, it copies everything from the space, including the space key. If you want to copy a space and import it into the same Confluence instance, you should use the Copy feature, and give your new space a different space key.

Resources:
Exporting a space: Exporting Confluence Pages and Spaces to XML
Importing a space: Restoring a Space

 

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Integrating Confluence and JIRA (part 2)

Posted in Confluence and JIRA, Tools on April 14th, 2011 by Jenny – 5 Comments

BachLast time, I left off at the point of displaying JIRA issues on a Confluence page. I’d found a way to insert single issues.

But I want to display a list of all the issues going into the release. The Atlassian documentation says to use the JIRA Issues macro, so that’s what I’ll try.

[Confluence 3.5, JIRA 4.3]

1. Create a search in JIRA for the issues you want to display

  1. In JIRA, click Issues to open the Issues Navigator.
  2. On the Summary tab, click Create new.
  3. In the panel, select your search parameters. I’ve picked the project, any issue type, the version, and a status of resolved.
  4. Click Search.
  5. Click View, and then select XML.
  6. Copy the URL from the address bar.

2. Insert the JIRA Issues macro on the Confluence page

  1. In Confluence, find the page where you want to add the list of JIRA issues.
  2. Click Edit.
  3. Click Insert, then select Other Macros.
  4. In the Search box, type “JIRA”.
  5. Click JIRA Issues.
  6. In the Insert JIRA Issues Macro window, in the URL field, paste the URL you copied from the JIRA search.
  7. In the JIRA Field Columns to Display field, type a comma-separated list of columns that you want to display.
  8. In the Title field, type a title for the table that will display the issues.
  9. Click Insert.
  10. Click Save.

Brilliant! That’s exactly what I want.

Now that I’ve got a list of issues displaying on my Confluence page, I need to set up a security scheme in JIRA so that I can control who sees the issues. I’ll let you know how that goes.

Resources:

JIRA Issues Macro

Photo via Flickr user Brian Stocks

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